Sonnet 8 – Elana Cowen Mezzo-Soprano with EWQL Cello and Piano

portrait-of-giovanni-gabrieli-with-the-lute

Image source: Portrait of Giovanni Gabrieli with the lute Annibale Carracci

This video recording of my setting of Sonnet 8 by William Shakespeare features Mezzo-Soprano Elana CowenEWQL Symphonic Orchestra Solo Cello and EWQL Pianos Bösendorfer 290 piano. The video includes a selection of public domain art image stills featuring music in art circa 1597 – 1886 (video image credits listed below). Most of the artwork is dated later than Shakespeare’s death in 1616, and many image stills include the lute referenced in the Sonnet.

Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy:
Why lov’st thou that which thou receiv’st not gladly,
Or else receiv’st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tunèd sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordèring;
Resembling sire and child and happy mother,
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing:
Whose speechless song being many, seeming one,
ngs this to thee: ‘Thou single wilt prove none.’

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

The Tyger – Caroline England Soprano with EWQL Cello and Piano

tiger-on-the-watch-1

Image source: “Tiger on the Watch” Jean-Leon Gerome

This video recording of my setting of The Tyger by William Blake features Soprano Caroline EnglandEWQL Symphonic Orchestra Solo Cello and EWQL Pianos Bösendorfer 290 piano. The video includes a selection of public domain art image stills featuring tigers in art (video image credits listed below).

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp!

When the stars threw down their spears
And water’d heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

The sheet music is free on request. Please contact me at sdpartlan at gmail dot com if you would like a copy of the score.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

O Captain! My Captain! – Bratislava Symphony Orchestra, David Hernando Rico

 

0.Abraham_Lincoln_by_George_Peter_Alexander_Healy

Image source: Abraham Lincoln – George P.A. Healy (1813 – 1894) (American) (Artist, Details of artist on Google Art Project) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

This video recording of my setting of O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman features the Bratislava Symphony Orchestra Choir with Conductor David Hernando Rico, and includes a selection of public domain art image stills of Abraham Lincoln, from years 1846 to 1865 (video image credits listed below).

The sheet music is free on request. Please contact me at sdpartlan at gmail dot com if you would like a copy of the score.

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head!
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
But I with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

  1. Abraham Lincoln – George P.A. Healy (1813 – 1894) (American) (Artist, Details of artist on Google Art Project) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  2. Quarter plate daguerreotype of Abraham Lincoln, Congressman-elect from Illinois. Nicholas H. Shepherd 1846 or 1847 – Library of Congress  [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  3. “Tough Campaigner for the Senate” Copy of a daguerreotype of Abraham Lincoln holding the antislavery newspaper Staat Zeitung. Polycarp Von Schneidau 1854 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  4. “Abraham Lincoln: Immediately prior to Senate nomination, Chicago, Illinois”  Alexander Hesler 1857 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  5. Ambrotype of Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Byers 1858 – Daniel W. Stowell [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  6. “Photograph of Abraham Lincoln by Samuel M. Fassett, Chicago, IL”
    Samuel M. Fassett 1859 – mearsonlineauctions [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  7. Full-length photograph of Abraham Lincoln. Unknown 1860 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  8. Photograph of Abraham Lincoln. Mathew Brady 1861 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  9. Abraham Lincoln and George B. McClellan in the general’s tent at Antietam, Maryland, October 3, 1862. Alexander Gardner 1862 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  10. Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. David Bachrach 1863 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  11. President Abraham Lincoln and Tad Lincoln. Mathew Brady ca. 1860 – ca. 1865 – U.S. National Archives and Records Administration [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  12. Abraham Lincoln, three-quarter length portrait, seated and holding his spectacles and a pencil. Alexander Gardner 5 February 1865 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  13. Lincoln’s funeral on Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. : 1865 April 19 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  14. Lincoln Memorial Jeff Kubina 16 August 2007 – Jeff Kubina, Licensed under Wikimedia Commons.

 

Sonnet 73 – William Shakespeare (Elana Cowen Mezzo-Soprano with EWQL Flute, Cello and Piano)

by-the-stream-autumn-1885

Image source: “By the Stream, Autumn” Paul Gauguin – 1885 – wikiart.org.

Note: this post has been updated to replace the original video link with a link to a warmer mix created with generous assistance from EastWest forums members. 

This video recording of my setting of William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73 features Mezzo-Soprano Elana Cowen, EWQL Hollywood Orchestral Woodwinds Flute and Alto Flute, EWQL Symphonic Orchestra Solo Cello and EWQL Pianos Bösendorfer 290 piano. The video includes a selection of public domain art image stills of Autumn and Winter landscape scenes, roughly in reverse chronological order from 1871 – 2013. Video image credits are provided below.

The sheet music is free and I am happy to give permission to modify the score in any way desired. Please contact me at sdpartlan at gmail dot com if you would like a copy of the score.

That time of year thou mayst in me behold,
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day,
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
   This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
   To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

  1. “Armenian Autumn 2013” by Kamosahakyan – (Own work) [CC BY-SA
    3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via
    Wikimedia Commons
  2. “A First Snow” by Timkov Nikolai 1980 – [CC BY-SA 3.0
    (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia
    Commons
  3. “Autumn over Labastide du Vert” Henri Martin – 1920
  4. “Autumn Algoma” J. E. H. MacDonald – 1918
  5. “The autumn sun” Ivan Grohar – 1908
  6. “Forest edge” Wassily Kandinsky – c. 1903
  7. “Herbstliche Dorfstraße mit Pferdefuhrwerk” Walter Moras – [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  8. “Fall landscape” Michail Markianovic Germasev(Bukowskis) – [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  9. “Autumn” Arkhip Kuindzhi – 1890
  10. “Podzimní nálada (autumn mood)” Oldřich Hlavsa (1889-1936) – [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  11. “The Old Tower in the Fields” Vincent van Gogh – 1884
  12. “Avenue of Poplars at Sunset” Vincent van Gogh – 1884
  13. “Autumn Landscape at Dusk” Vincent van Gogh – 1885
  14. “Avenue of Poplars” Vincent van Gogh – 1884
  15. “Autumn Landscape with Four Trees” Vincent van Gogh – 1885
  16. “Avenue of Poplars at Sunset” Vincent van Gogh – 1884
  17. “By the Stream, Autumn” Paul Gauguin – 1885
  18. “Along the woods in Autumn” Alfred Sisley – 1885
  19. “Landscape under Snow, Upper Norwood” Camille Pissarro – 1871
  20. “Snow Effect at Veneux” Alfred Sisley – 1884
  21. “Snow at Louveciennes” Alfred Sisley – 1878
  22. “Snow on the Road, Louveciennes (Chemin de la Machine)” Alfred Sisley – 1874

O Captain! My Captain! – Walt Whitman (EWQL Choirs & Solo Trumpet)

Abraham_Lincoln_O-116_by_Gardner,_1865

Image source: Abraham Lincoln, three-quarter length portrait, seated and holding his spectacles and a pencil. Alexander Gardner 5 February 1865 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

This video recording of my setting of O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman features East/West Quantum Leap (EWQL) Symphonic Choirs and Solo Trumpet (Hollywood Brass), and includes a selection of public domain art image stills of Abraham Lincoln, from years 1846 to 1865 (video image credits listed below).

The sheet music is free and I am happy to give permission to modify the score in any way desired: please contact me at sdpartlan at gmail dot com if you would like a copy of the score.

Technical details for the sound recording are provided at the bottom of this post.

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head!
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
But I with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

  1. Abraham Lincoln – George P.A. Healy (1813 – 1894) (American) (Artist, Details of artist on Google Art Project) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  2. Quarter plate daguerreotype of Abraham Lincoln, Congressman-elect from Illinois. Nicholas H. Shepherd 1846 or 1847 – Library of Congress  [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  3. “Tough Campaigner for the Senate” Copy of a daguerreotype of Abraham Lincoln holding the antislavery newspaper Staat Zeitung. Polycarp Von Schneidau 1854 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  4. “Abraham Lincoln: Immediately prior to Senate nomination, Chicago, Illinois”  Alexander Hesler 1857 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  5. Ambrotype of Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Byers 1858 – Daniel W. Stowell [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  6. “Photograph of Abraham Lincoln by Samuel M. Fassett, Chicago, IL”
    Samuel M. Fassett 1859 – mearsonlineauctions [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  7. Full-length photograph of Abraham Lincoln. Unknown 1860 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  8. Photograph of Abraham Lincoln. Mathew Brady 1861 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  9. Abraham Lincoln and George B. McClellan in the general’s tent at Antietam, Maryland, October 3, 1862. Alexander Gardner 1862 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  10. Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. David Bachrach 1863 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  11. President Abraham Lincoln and Tad Lincoln. Mathew Brady ca. 1860 – ca. 1865 – U.S. National Archives and Records Administration [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  12. Abraham Lincoln, three-quarter length portrait, seated and holding his spectacles and a pencil. Alexander Gardner 5 February 1865 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  13. Lincoln’s funeral on Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. : 1865 April 19 – Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
  14. Lincoln Memorial Jeff Kubina 16 August 2007 – Jeff Kubina, Licensed under Wikimedia Commons.

Technical Details:

PC: Dell Inspiron  Inspiron 17-7737 with 16 gig RAM and 4th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-4510U processor (4M Cache, up to 3.1 GHz)

Audio Interface: Native Instruments Komplete Audio 6

Headphones (for playback): Sennheiser HD-280 PRO

Notation Software: Sibelius 7.5

DAW: Cubase LE 6

EastWest Play: Version 4.2.2

Play Libraries: Hollywood Brass Diamond (Solo Trumpet Exp Vib Omni) and Symphonic Choirs Platinum (WB Soft Mod Boys and Tenors multis; boys on Sop I & II and Tenors on Tenor & Alto parts). All libraries located on external drive shipped with CCC 2 Pro.

Play Settings for Boys Sop I & Sop II & Tenors: stage mic, no reverb, Portamento ON, mixer gain 12 on each util except for Tenors Util Soft P6, which is set to 8 to reduce “sh” “k” “t” sounds.

Play Settings for Trumpet: Gain 0, Main mic.

Cubase mixer gains: Sop I 4.75, Sop II 2.8, Tenor 2.6, Alto -2.0, Trumpet 4.0, Master 6.02.

Wordbuilder votox text and setttings:

oO KAP Ten may KAP Ten uOr FEar Ful TreEP Ez dun t!u S!eEP HAz wea t!urd ev rEE rAK t!u PraE zwEE SoT Ez wun t!u PorT Ez nEar t!u bel zaE HEEr t!u PEE Pul al e Xul TEng waEl Fal loO aEz t!u STe dEE KEEl t!u ve Sel GreEm An dear Eng buT oO HarT HarT HarT oO t!u blEE dEng droPS uv Red wear an t!u DeK maE KAP Ten layz Fal en Kold An ded oO KAP Ten may KAP Ten ray zUP An HEar t!u belz raE zuP For yO t!u FlAg Ez Flung For yO t!u byO gul TrElz For yO boO KiEz And ReE band wrEET!S For yO t!u S!orz a KruO dEng For yO t!iE Kal t!u SwiE Eng mAS t!iEr EE gur FiE Sez Tur nEng HEar KAP Ten dEEr Fa t!ur t!ES arm BEE nEET! Yor Hed ET Ez Sum DrEEm t!AT an t!u DeK yOv Fal en Kold An ded may KAP Ten duZ noT An Sur HEz lEPS uOr PiEl And STeEl may KAP Ten duZ noT FEEl may uOrm HEE HAz noO PulS nor WeEl t!u S!eEP Ez An Kurd SiEF And SuOnd ETS voE Aj Klozd An Dun Frum FEar Ful TreEP t!u vEK Tur S!eEP Kumz En WET! ab jeKT wun e XulT oO S!oOrz And rEng oO belz bu Tay wET! moOrn Ful Tred WalK t!u DeK maE KAP Ten layz Fal en Kold An ded

*****************************
‘T’ vol = 103 for most ‘T’s.
Schwa sound, e.g., “Trip” and “Ship” e vol = 40, len = 50 ms; E vol = 98

‘Ea’ blend, e.g., “nEar” E vol = 103, a vol = 11, full overlap.

‘r’ extended in “Turning” to overlap ‘u’

The Tyger – William Blake (Matthew Curtis, Choral Tracks LLC)

tiger-1912

Image source:  “Tiger” Franz Marc 1912

This video recording of my setting of The Tyger by William Blake includes a selection of public domain art image stills featuring tigers (video image credits listed below).

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp!

When the stars threw down their spears
And water’d heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

The sheet music is available here at CPDL for free downloading.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

The Lamb – William Blake (Matthew Curtis, Choral Tracks LLC)

 

Äåòè ñ áàðàøêîì

 

Image source:  “Children with a Lamb” – Vladimir Borovikovsky

This video recording of my setting of The Lamb by William Blake includes a selection of public domain art image stills featuring lambs and sheep (video image credits listed below).

Little Lamb who made thee
         Dost thou know who made thee
Gave thee life & bid thee feed.
By the stream & o’er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing wooly bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice!
         Little Lamb who made thee
         Dost thou know who made thee

 

         Little Lamb I’ll tell thee,
         Little Lamb I’ll tell thee!
He is called by thy name,
For he calls himself a Lamb:
He is meek & he is mild,
He became a little child:
I a child & thou a lamb,
We are called by his name.
         Little Lamb God bless thee.
         Little Lamb God bless thee.

The sheet music is available here at CPDL for free downloading.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

Ave verum corpus (Matthew Curtis, Choral Tracks LLC)

 

Carl_Strathmann_Maria

Image source: “Carl Strathmann Maria” by Carl Strathmamn – Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Note: this post has been updated to replace the link to the original video using EastWest/Quantum Leap Symphonic Choirs with a link to a video featuring Matthew Curtis, Choral Tracks LLC

This video recording of my Ave verum corpus, a Eucharist hymn, includes a selection of public domain art image stills illustrating the message of the text (video image credits listed below). 

The Latin text (English translation here) is as follows:

Ave, verum corpus natum
de Maria Virgine:
vere passum, immolatum
in cruce pro homine:
cuius latus perforatum
fluxit aqua et sanguine:
esto nobis praegustatum,
in mortis examine.

The sheet music is available here at CPDL for free downloading.

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS:

 

Magnificat in F

Image source: “John William Waterhouse – The Annunciation”. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Matthew Curtis of Choral Tracks LLC created this beautiful audio recording of my Magnificat In F, illustrated in the video with my own selection of public domain art image stills of the Magnificat scene painted through the centuries (video image credits listed below).

The text is an English translation (Rite I, Book of Common Prayer) of the Magnificat Canticle:

3 The Song of Mary – Magnificat
Luke 1:46-55

My soul doth magnify the Lord,
and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior.
For he hath regarded
the lowliness of his handmaiden.
For behold from henceforth
all generations shall call me blessed.
For he that is mighty hath magnified me,
and holy is his Name.
And his mercy is on them that fear him
throughout all generations.
He hath showed strength with his arm;
he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts.
He hath put down the mighty from their seat,
and hath exalted the humble and meek.
He hath filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he hath sent empty away.
He remembering his mercy hath holpen his servant Israel,
as he promised to our forefathers,
Abraham and his seed for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

The sheet music is available here at CPDL for free downloading.

Visit Matthew Curtis at these links for more samples of his amazing work:

https://www.facebook.com/ChoralTracks

http://choraltracks.com/

VIDEO IMAGE CREDITS: